Generalized Anxiety Counseling

Through The Forest Counseling of Boston

100 Cambridge St, Boston, MA 02114
+1 (857) 299-1123

Through The Forest Counseling of Quincy

859 Willard St Ste 400b, Quincy, MA 02169
+1 (617) 845-0990

Through The Forest Counseling of New Haven

157 Church St 19th FL, Connecticut Financial Center, New Haven, CT 06510

According to research, people with anxiety (generalized anxiety disorder and social anxiety disorder) are more sensitive to negative feedback and learn more under these settings. However, the parallels may end there. Any worry in any of life’s key domains—health, finances, or work—can be classified as a generalized anxiety disorder. Anxiety is a mental and physical feeling of negative expectation. It is characterized mentally by elevated alertness and trepidation tortured into excruciating worry, and physically by uncomfortable activation of many-body systems—all to facilitate response to an unknown danger, real or imagined.

The cognitive thoughts of dread in expectation of a terrible outcome, as well as physical symptoms like jitteriness and a racing heart, are intended to cause discomfort. Anxiety is designed to draw your attention and motivate you to make the necessary changes to defend what you value. Anxiety is normal and can even be beneficial on occasion. Anxiety might be thought of as the price we humans pay for being able to imagine the future.

Social anxiety disorder is characterized by a unique worry—negative judgment by others—that manifests only in social situations. Scientists have discovered a link between optimism and anxiety. It has long been recognized that most people are predisposed to have a positive attitude toward life. However, current research indicates that this prejudice does not exist in studies that suffer from generalized anxiety. People who suffer from social anxiety, on the other hand, maintain a broad sense of optimism.

Anxiety becomes a disorder when worry about possible dangers (“Will I catch COVID-19 if I touch a doorknob?”) or negative outcomes (“Will my girlfriend stop finding me attractive if I go bald?”) arises for no discernible reason, or it is disproportionate to the situation, or it lasts beyond moves to solve any possible problem, or the worry or physical symptoms cause you to avoid situations that may trigger symptoms. While a small amount of anxiety can enhance drive and performance, excessive anxiety disrupts activities and performance, potentially incapacitating people.

Anxiety manifests itself physically (racing heart, physical breathing, difficulty concentrating) as well as mentally (excessive imagining of doomsday scenarios), and the bodily symptoms and worrying thoughts feed each other, creating a vicious spiral that makes the thinking feel difficult to control. One of the many ironies of anxiety disorders: Although there are effective treatments, people may avoid seeking help because they feel embarrassed about their concerns.

According to research, people with generalized anxiety disorder and social anxiety disorder are more sensitive to negative feedback and learn more under these situations. However, the parallels may end there. Any worry in any of life’s key domains—health, finances, or work—can be classified as a generalized anxiety disorder.

Social anxiety disorder is characterized by a unique worry—negative judgment by others—that manifests only in social situations. Scientists have discovered a link between optimism and anxiety. It has long been recognized that most people are predisposed to have a positive attitude toward life. However, current research indicates that this prejudice does not occur in people who suffer from generalized anxiety. People who suffer from social anxiety, on the other hand, maintain a broad sense of optimism.

Anxiety is a normal, necessary, and helpful mental state of apprehension about what may or may not happen in the future; it is usually accompanied by a slew of unpleasant physical sensations—jitteriness, pounding heart—to draw our attention. Its purpose is to warn us of the likelihood of danger and to encourage us to take the appropriate precautions to protect ourselves.

Anxiety is completely normal and one of the inescapable expenses of being—and staying—alive. However, fears can spiral out of hand at times. They intensify or persist, exceeding the brain’s ability to analyze the possible risk logically. Alternatively, the brain may become locked on high alert, repeatedly executing its bias toward negative information by looking for disaster everywhere it looks. Anxiety can become a disorder when it interferes with daily functioning or causes undue discomfort in these circumstances.

Anxiety is a natural help to survival, a key aspect of the human defensive system, in which typically harmless stimuli can generate outsized negative emotional expectations. Every person alive today is the beneficiary of a brain that has a powerful enough capacity for worry to have enabled early identification and triumph over risks that have arisen over the ages of human existence. Anxiety, in moderation, is a blessing to daily life—it motivates people to overcome obstacles and improves performance.

Anxiety, according to research, involves the activation of specific brain areas, such as the anterior insula, which improves the ability to predict potential harm and learn to avoid it. The threshold and degree of activation of the brain nodes that play a role in anxiety vary naturally between people. Experience can also alter the settings: A history of early harm might permanently affect the threshold of sensitivity of such brain areas, making people anxious or quickly overwhelmed with worry.

The term “generalized anxiety disorder” tends to the fact that it is simply that: generalized. Concern exists in one of life’s key domains, and the cognitive load of worry is out of proportion to the possibility of any negative events perceived to lie ahead.

Phobias typically have a very narrow focus. There is also a significant mental distinction: The dread in phobias is relatively quick; it does not indicate a continuous state of apprehension, yet it is out of proportion to the actual harm offered.

Phobias tend to focus on specific items or situations and cluster in many distinct categories: animals (snakes and spiders head the pack of dreaded animals), natural settings (heights, thunderstorms), and injury (blood, injections).

What is the next step?

If you or someone you love is considering individual therapy or counseling, please contact Through The Forest Counseling. We are a team of professionals who have the expertise to help.

Call us at our office to schedule an appointment with one of our highly skilled clinicians at Through The Forest Counseling.